TDD (Test Driven development)
 

There are lots of practices that need to be followed while doing XP as an agile methodology. And one of them is automated testing. However, there is lots of confusion in the tech industry if you want to test the behavior of the system or the subunits/parts of the system. First, lets us understand these terminologies. In this post, we will talk about Test driven development.

TDD (Test Driven development)

TDD or Test Driven development is an approach in which unit tests drive the development of the code. That is, when there is a new feature that needs to be developed, the unit tests corresponding to the feature is developed first before the actual code need to create the feature is coded.

Let’s take an example. Let’s say at a point of sale system, we need to calculate the bill based on the list of products picked by the consumer. Let’s write unit test corresponding to this code. (I have used C# based XUnit as the unit testing framework)

        [Fact(DisplayName = "SimpleBiller Should Calculate Total bill Amount")]
        public void SimpleBillShouldCalculate()
        {
            //Given
            var ProductsList = new List();
            ProductsList.Add(new Product { Name = "test Product1", Price = 5 });
            ProductsList.Add(new Product { Name = "test Product2", Price = 5 });
            var simpleBill = new SimpleBiller();

            //When
            var bill = simpleBill.GenerateBill(ProductsList);

            //then
            Assert.Equal(10, bill.TotalCost);
        }

In the above Unit test, we have 3 parts.

  • Given
  • When
  • Then

Given

This is the known part of the problem. i.e in mathematical terms, it’s part of the problem. In the example, we have initialized the variables and known things corresponding to the products (selected by the consumer) and the Biller object.

When

This is the business action based on which we are writing the code. In this case its GenerateBill action/method.

Then

The purpose of the tests is to ensure that the code/action does it properly as per the plan. In order to do that, we are asserting the assumptions/result of the method we are testing. In our case, we are asserting the total amount that the bill will have to be generated for.

Running the test

There are three stages of running the test.

  • Red – When we run the test now, it will fail as there is no code corresponding to the calculate bill functionality.
  • Green – In order to fix the above test, let’s write the real code corresponding to the above unit test/requirement.
        public Bill GenerateBill(IEnumerable products)
        {
            var bill = new Bill { Products = products };
            foreach (var product in bill.Products)
            {
                bill.TotalCost += product.Price;
            }

            return bill;
        }

Now, when we call GenerateBill method from the test, it will return the Bill with the total amount.

  • Refactor – With the above code written corresponding to the test, we are sure the functionality is correct as per the requirement. But the code is not optimal, as the foreach loop can be reduced to a simple C# LINQ  expression.
        public Bill GenerateBill(IEnumerable products)
        {
            var bill = new Bill { Products = products };
            bill.TotalCost = bill.Products.Sum(x => x.Price);
            return bill;
        }

Conclusion

TDD is a foolproof approach to developing software as per the requirement. The test also provides confidence to the developers on the edge conditions and other possibilities in the code. However, there is an alternative thought that TDD could waste developer time. Do you think, TDD is the right approach to software development? Please provide your comments.

Kanban – step by step implementation
 

You are ready to leverage Kanban in your project.  At this moment you are convinced that Kanban works, it could be a good tool for your project and you understand when this is to be used. The big question is how to go about it.  Let’s discuss that in simplest possible manner.

Visualize your work and existing resources – You need to understand answers to following questions.  What kind of work or EPICs do you have? How long it to complete them?  How many team members you have? What are their capabilities? Customer priority? Release cycle?  What is the existing set of processes used at your BU or org level? How do you get work and what is the priority? The delivery expectations?

Setup Kanban Board – Once you have an answer to #1, you can set a Kanban board. For that, you need various stages, criteria (Definition of complete for that stage in order to be ready to move the item to next stage). You can have a white board and sticky notes to build your kanban board. You can leverage tools like Trello instead of leverage whiteboard/sticky notes.  This may change over a period of time hence starting with Todo, In Progress and Done stages can be a good idea.

Define WIP limit – The WIP limit is assigned to each stage (Represents individual column). The WIP limit restricts team to add more items in the specific stage. This literally removes lots of waste. It does not allow you to focus only on one stage instead encourages continuous production.

Identify and Define Roles and Responsibilities – Kanban doesn’t prescribe specific roles but it is a good idea to have a product owner, scrum master and team member roles. Although in typically Kanban projects, the role of SM is very limited.

Start working – Start working on the model. Don’t be rigid on the number of stages, WIP limit, roles, and processes. This gets better over a time. Do not break the WIP limit rule. If you think the limit you set is not right, change it. This is most adaptive process hence most learning will be on the ground. The processes can be adjusted as you move forward.

Matrices/reports – You can have utilization, productivity, cycle time and other matrices. Do watch it closely as this would help you to stabilize the process per company need.  The cumulative workflow diagram would be a really good choice to constantly monitor as it gives you very clear picture in terms of where the project stands.

 

Kanban – Let’s get started
 

Kanban (refers to visual board or billboard in Japanese) is a lean scheduling tool that works on JIT (Just in Time) manufacturing concept. The JIT is a model in which products are built to meet pressing requirements over building it in excess.  This helps to improve productivity, reduce waste by limiting work in progress items, support continuous delivery and maximizing customer value.

Kanban board is a visualization tool as shown above.   The number of stages could of any number depends on your need. For instance, in my previous project, we were using

  • To Do – When the item is groomed and ready to be picked
  • In Progress – The item is picked and being worked on.
  • QA – The development is completed. It is ready for integration testing.
  • Done – Delivered to the customer.

The stages and conditions as I described earlier are subject to individual need. The Kanban process is highly Adaptive.  It does not prescribe any roles. Let’s look at some of the processes or tools in specific order (rigid to adaptive)

Waterfall – More rigid
XP
Scrum
Kanban – More Adaptive

The work in progress plays a critical role. This ensures there is nothing at any stage over produced which result in reducing wastage. There is not a secret formula to set a WIP limit. All you have to look at is how many members you have in time and how many items they can work for you to have expected utilization. When you start, it is perfectly alright to have wrong WIP limit. You can always change it as you move on.

Just to make it more clear, this is how I set up WIP limits for my previous project example where my team size was 11. All of them used to play the role of Developer as well as QA.

To Do – 5  – Wanted to restrict to a number of groom items as we had customer dependency to unblock individual item (Access and other dependencies). Once we get the access to customer environment, we cannot wait for a long time to get started on that.

In Progress – 6 – I always wanted individuals to focus on QA as well as unblocking backlog item to continue the flow hence I limit this to 6.

QA – 2 – Sound interesting. Isn’t it? Well, anything which is dev-done (typically takes 3-4 weeks of development), the QA work was limited to 2 days. Anything which reaches to QA, should be quickly completed and delivered to the customer so that I can recognize my revenue. The advance of two is, an individual must complete it in order to move dev complete items to QA. If the WIP limit is full, even an item is dev complete, it used to remain there.

In addition to above, I kept WIP limited to leverage pair programming benefit as well. I wanted on complicated items folks to pair program. The above number, I reached over a period of time. The initial WIP limit turned our to be wrong which was expected.

The Agile Methods explain some of the core frameworks or agile process tools similarities and differences.

Please refer the following blog for step by step process to implement Kanban in your project.

Kanban – Step by step implementation

Planning & grooming process for distributed (not co-located) agile teams
 

Most agile frameworks encourage team co-location to have

  • Better communication, mutual trust & respect
  • Better alignment and support
  • Lesser operational costs and smooth management resulting in a better outcome.

All of these are designed for achieving better results as a team. Unfortunately with globalization (offshore/onshore model), there are very few teams that are fully co-located.

In such a scenario, sprint ceremonies are often challenging when you are following Scrum or XP model. In this article, I am going to focus only on planning and grooming ceremonies. I have tried this approach in many teams in the past with significant success.

Planning and Grooming
Agilechamps – Planning and grooming

Assumption

In order to better understand the model, let’s assume that you have one sprint team with 12 members split equally into two teams and separated by multiple time zones. The product owner and Scrum master are co-located and duration of each sprint is 2 weeks long, starting on Tuesday. Assume the team velocity is 40 story points, completing approximately 10 features and 10 bugs in a given sprint on an average.  For this example, let us assume the teams to be located in India and the USA J

Approach

The product owner tries to ensure that at least 2 sprints worth of work is well prioritized at any given time. The team focuses on getting sprint work done during the first week of sprint. The team assumes 10 hours’ time for each USA and India team in each sprint to pre-groom stories. The teams spend some time each day pre-grooming stories and creating tasks during the second week of the sprint along with the continued effort towards their existing sprint goals. The goal of this exercise is to ensure that both teams have enough clarity on stories to be able to start working on them from day one of the upcoming sprint.

During this period (the second week), individual teams should communicate with the product owner or other members of the team to retrieve as much information as possible to flesh out requirements and discover potential blockers.

While this may appear a little tough in the beginning, it gets better over time as team members gradually become accustomed to the code base and business functionality, and are able to make better-educated guesses and assumptions about the stories. Initially, teams might even find themselves spending close to 10 hours a week in these activities, but the time needed drops off significantly in due course. This is especially true for teams that are less exposed to business or may be newly formed.

At this point, both teams have a better understanding of stories what they have groomed. During the planning meeting, both teams talk about each story they have groomed. I would personally suggest teams conduct sprint planning meetings on the last day of the sprint. This ensures that the first day of the next sprint is not wasted deciding what to work on.

Pointing stories is a group activity where inputs from all stakeholders can be considered while assigning points to stories.

Both the team collectively go with sprint commitments after the planning meeting.

Benefits

  • Combined planning meetings are short as at least one of the team has clarity over requirements for each story. I have often seen individuals get on to planning meeting with little or no knowledge about stories resulting in long meetings. This also results in only one team being engaged in the meeting while the others become impatient and disengaged.
  • Product owners are human. It is normal for them to not have all the answers up front. This approach gives them sufficient time to gather missing details; details that they might not even have considered necessary unless brought up by developers
  • The team gets enough time to groom stories since they often have questions for the business owners or for other teams that are easy to answer, but a response needs a turnaround time of a day or two because of time zone differences.
  • The team who has less context on business come up to speed with business, processes, and resolving dependencies wherever applicable.
  • A geographically split team doesn’t mean individuals have to work in isolation.

This model helps teams realize a number of benefits which include (but are not limited to):

  • Improved quality
  • Better commitment
  • High productivity
  • High morale
  • Better team bonding
Agile Capacity Planning (Download Template)
 

What is a Capacity Planning

The number of productive hours available for a sprint is called sprint capacity. The capacity is calculated before starting a sprint to identify how many stories team can accomplish for the upcoming sprint. This process is called capacity planning. This helps the team to make a commitment (How many story-points team would complete).

How to do Capacity Planning

Please download the template for capacity planning available at

Download AC Capacity Planning Template

Follow below steps

  1. Provide sprint start and end date. State daily total hours available each day for one person.
  2. Mention all the team member names (Column B11 onwards)
  3. Set high-level default percentages and click “Set Default Allocation” Button.
  4. The defaults will be set. These can be updated for individuals as per your team allocation.
  5.  Click “Plan Button”
  6. This would open capacity sheet with available hours for each individual for all days (Start to end of the sprint)
  7. You can make changes to individuals availability on specific days. Consider holidays, time off and other factors which affect hours for given days.
  8. Fill in details of past sprints if you have data. If not, you would start having that from next sprint onwards once you start using this planner.
  9. Based on past sprint data you get hours per story points in the Capacity sheet that would help us to derive how many story points we can really commit for upcoming sprint for which we are doing capacity planning.

Please note you can use the template I provided or any other template you or your company already have. My goal is just to make the process easy and make you understand the benefit.

Benefits

  • Considering time-offs, vacations and availability percentage help us to identify available hours which eventually help us to pick the right amount of work for a given sprint.
  • Many sprint team does this manually which has two disadvantages
    • The chances of making mistake are high.
    • When you are considering velocity for next sprint, you simply pick an amount of work which is equal to past sprint velocity or an average of past few sprint data.  Both of which are not correct. For instance, your team has completed 45, 30 and 32 story-points in three respective sprints which the available hours were 450, 310 and 340 respectively. Now in current sprint, you have available hours are 470.  Considering average or last sprint velocity is not right in this case.
  • Increases chances of sprint success.

In order to see the real benefit of this template, you must have to use it for at least 3-4 sprints.

 

Feel free to provide your suggestion in case if you want me to add any additional capability to this template.

Azure Functions in plain English
 

AWS Lambda and Azure functions are truly next generational in the sense of the cloud computing. These services simplify the amount of time it takes to move to a cloud-based solution. Following are some of the advantages of running services directly in functions/Lambda.

  • No infrastructure code
  • Easy scaling
  • Easy deployment
  • Gives focus on the business

In this article, we will explore how to create a simple azure function and execute it in simple 5 steps.

1.  Search for Functions in the Azure Portal and select it.

2. Click on “Create” and Create functions form should appear.

3. Enter the App Name, Subscription, Location and select “Create”. After it is created, you should see a page like this.

4. Select “Functions” from the left menu and on the right side select “Webhook + API” and click on “Create this function”.

5. Below screen appears where you can write code for the function and deploy the same. Edit code and select “Run” to update the deployment and run.

That’s all and functions are as simple as that. Hope this article helps in creating functions with Azure simpler. Please feel free to post your questions in the comments section.