Understand themes, epics and user stories
 

Themes – A Theme is a group of EPICS that represents area of focus.  For instance “Product going online” or “moving to cloud” or  “launch in India”. Typically program managers assign financial value to themes to ensure objectives and strategic direction of an organization is aligned with program. These are typically at very broader level (Program or entire project level)

EPICs – An Epic is a large story that cannot be completed in a single sprint hence it is broken down in group of user stories. Hence it would make more sense to say that EPICs are collection of related user stories.  For instance you say that theme is “Going to cloud” and EPIC is “improve password page usability”. The user story could be “The validation messages should be very clear so that I should be able to correct it easily”

User Stories –  User stories is a description of a software feature from an end user perspective who desires the new capability.  Precisely it is simplified version of user or customer requirements.

Here is the template for user story

As a <type of user>, I want <some goal> so that <some reason>.

 

A good user story can convey a clear understanding to programmer about requirement. The characteristic of user stories are

Testable, Estimable, Small, Negotiable, Independent and Valuable.

A specific user story can belong to more than one theme, but certainly does not to multiple epics.

Scrum Ceremonies – Demo/Review or Showcase
 

A showcase, demo or sprint review represents one and same thing. A sprint review is an informal meeting that typically takes the form of a demo of the completed features or what is accomplished during the sprint to the product owner (And rest of the team).

This can be done as and when the work is completed over waiting for last day of the sprint to arrive. This mitigates the risk of incorporating review comments which may result in sprint failure if the demo is done at the last day of the sprint.  In case if there are review comments, that should be fixed and once again demo to be conducted for the story which had review comments.

The whole team should participate. Although the team needs to get the buy-in from PO to change the story to done-done while the feedback from the whole team helps.  You can invite other teams, support or customer as needed.

One of the core objectives of the demo is to review progress against the sprint goal and team commitment. It is an opportunity to get everyone on the same page in terms of what was accomplished, what’s still on progress and what tradeoffs were made.

Best practices around Demo/Showcase

  • Prepare, prepare and prepare – Don’t go in demo meeting and start talking randomly. Everyone’s time is important including you.
  • Practice before the demo – Run the workflow or the feature you have built. This ensures everything works.
  • Give importance to Acceptance Criteria – You can always talk about nonfunctional requirements while the focus should be on acceptance criteria. What value your feature is adding to product/business.
  • Follow KISS – Keep it short and simple – Don’t complicate things. Make it crisp, cover all the points written down in acceptance criteria. Give time to your team and PO to ask questions.
  • Showcase Value – Do not focus on technology or the feature you have built works while do talk about business value. Feel the sense of pride or accomplishment in showcasing what you accomplished.
  • Communication – It’s key to success. Talk to the point. Listen to people (your team). Write down their feedback and comments. The good idea is to record the meeting so that you can always go back and listen to the feedback if any.
  • Involve right participants/stakeholders – Not just your sprint team or PO but you should be inviting folks representing your product business.  Folks on the actual ground adds lots of value to the project/product.
  • Seek Feedback – Accept the feedback positively. Your goal is your team success, making a product better and help the organization to get more value.  This eventually helps your to grow faster.

 

Scrum Ceremonies – Planning and Grooming
 

The entire sprint team work together and plan for next sprint goals. The sprint planning meeting is attended by the scrum master, product owner and rest of the Scrum team. The other teams may be invited on a need basis.

The PO ensures product backlog priority is up to date (At least top level items) for the team to pick up items from the product backlog. The stories are picked up and prioritized. The PO usually talks about sprint goal and once that is finalized, the stories are being picked up to for grooming.

For each story, product owner writes down the description of story and acceptance criteria. While grooming it can be further updated by PO and team. The team gets answers for their queries from PO with respect to functional expectations. In addition to that team work together to identify dependencies, constraints and nonfunctional requirements. The team typically elaborate more on functional requirements as well.  The stories are broken down into multiple tasks.

All the groomed stories are then estimated by the team.  Each story is tagged with story point or hours. The task usually is tagged with planned hours. The scrum master and team look at the velocity and capacity of the team and commit the amount of work which can be delivered in sprint.

At the end of this meeting, the scrum team would have two artifacts ready

  1. Sprint Goal
  2. Sprint Backlog

 

Best Practices

  • I always suggest the team go with pre-grooming. Typically planning happens a day before or when we are about to start a sprint. Understanding every story the first time, grooming, tasking and estimating take too much of time. Due to time constraints, it is not very effective and done half-heartedly. Moreover, all the questions can’t be answered upfront. This is one of the main cause of sprint failures in most projects as you are not sure of what you are committing. One of a good idea is to keep looking at upcoming stories and clarify all the doubts with PO or other stakeholders in advance. Spending 30 minutes to an hour by few folks in team 4-5 days in the previous sprint helps to do much better for next sprint.  With this, the planning meeting will have just three goals
    1. Explain everyone expectations from stories and get aligned
    2. Estimate
    3. Once #1 and #2 are done for all the stories, commit sprint.

Note: Many times, the business and competition demand last minute priority work to be picked when you start the Sprint. This is fine as long as it’s minimal.

  • PO shouldn’t be telling how much of work team should be picking. The team should take a wise decision by looking at previous sprint capacity. The idea is to have sprint success and continuous improvement.
  • Always keep little buffer for planning next sprint items, unknowns in existing sprints and tech debts
  • A lot of teams prefer to keep 20% time aside to deal with tech debts. This may be a good idea while I always suggest the team to plan for this 20% during sprint planning and grooming only. What you plan is what can be accomplished.
  • Don’t be very aggressive as the quality of software in most cases is more important over quantity.
  • The team member shouldn’t be picking up multiple stories in advance. Each and every member should pick one story and once done they should move to the next one as per the priority order specified in Sprint. The exception to picking up the items within Sprint should be ok as long as PO is good with that.
  • Always create a task for stories. Don’t just include tasks which have business values while do consider tasks related to development and testing. For instance testing, code reviews, writing tests etc. Keep in mind, don’t write too many tasks.
  • Try to break down the story to as small as possible while if the estimation is going beyond then it’s important to divide that into smaller stories. There are instances where you can’t break down the story to the level where you are not getting business value out of it which is OK at a times but do avoid this situation as much as possible.
  • The story where lots of research is involved and there are unknowns which need to be unearthed, prefer to go with Spike.
  • Trust each other and support each other.
  • Pair when needed while do not work on the same task in series unless absolutely necessary. I have seen with the offshore-onshore model, the story is being worked on one story at offshore and further, it is handed off to another team member at onshore. These cycles keep repeating. The amount of productivity loss happens in this approach is not worth it.

Important Tip – The scope creep can be managed within Sprint with only two ways

  1. Refuse new work in the middle of Sprint and take up that in next Sprint.
  2. If it’s absolutely mandatory to pick the work in the middle, you need to take out an equal amount of work from Sprint.

At times, you are done with Sprint in advance, in that case, you can pick more work while it is always better idea to increase your velocity and focus on tech debts, testing, and quality practices. You can even spend time on learning which is usually way more important than we usually think

Scrum Ceremonies – Retrospectives
 

No matter how great your team is, there is always scope to improve and get better. The retrospective is way to accomplish this periodically. The main focus is to look at what is working and what is not? Further what are the action items we have based on our learning.  The core focus of retrospective is continuous improvement which is one of the core philosophy of agile.

The primary agenda of this meeting  where every team member is expected to bring their points are

  1. What worked well?
  2. What did not work well?
  3. Action items to improve the process (Mainly action items are result of what did not work well)

How to do it

  • Set the stage. Invite entire team for a meeting (Scrum Master, Product Owner, Team and Customer if possible)
  • Give 10 minutes to everyone to enter their points towards 3 agenda items stated above. The recommendation is to use a tool (For instance noteapp) and send this to whole team in advance to enter their points. This would save time for team in meeting and moreover give enough time to team members to think and state their points.
  • Start with talking about previous retrospectives action items. Close the items which are accomplished.
  • Talk about what worked well, appreciate people and motivate team to continue utilizing the best practices.
  • Further Discuss what did not work well and come with action items
  • Assign owners for every action item.
  • Close the retrospective while action items to go to action item register.

BEST Practices

  • Typically it should happen after every sprint and should last between 30 to 60 minutes.
  • The whole team should participate.
  • This can be considered as “lesson learned” meeting. The notes can go to organization process assets  (Remember “PAL” or “Process Asset Library”).
  • The owners must be assigned to action items. The next retrospective should start with open items of previous retrospective meetings. I have seen, individual teams have excellent ideas while post retrospective nobody really thinks about it.
  • One of the recommendation is to have retrospective of retrospectives to make it better.
  • Don’t point fingers instead work as team and support each other.
  • Do not forget to appreciate your team members.
Scrum Ceremonies – Daily Stand Ups
 

The agenda of this meeting should be:

1.  What did you accomplish since the last meeting

2. What are you planning to work on until next meeting

3. What issues are blocking your progress (Impediments)

BEST Practices

  • This is not a status to management instead making sure the whole team is on same page. Stand up is not a meeting. It should clearly intended to be standup.
  • The stand ups should be strictly time-boxed to 10 minutes. The standard scrum practice says 15 minutes while with my last many years of experience, I see better results with 10 minutes.
  • Hold the meeting “Without chairs”. Everyone must stand and speak up.
  • Plan to do this in morning. If you have sprint team outside of your country and common meeting held only in the evening then plan to meet whoever is available in morning for 5 minutes for quick sync up with same agenda. The evening stand ups are just status or post mortem which doesn’t serve the purpose of stand ups.
  • Everybody in team reports to three agenda items listed above to rest of the team.
  • Prefer to have this meeting at the same place and time everyday. Meeting morning is very important as it helps set the context for upcoming work.
  • The quick questions and clarifications can be covered at a times while do remember that the meeting must have to be end within 10 minutes. Please understand when I say quick, I am referring closed ended quick questions. The rest everything should go offline or should be addressed with other meetings.
  • The meeting should not be cancelled even some of the members are not present. As a team member it is extremely important for you to attend the meeting if you are not on leave that day.
Agile Top 10 Interview Questions
 

agilechamps.com top 10 interview questions

Following are the TOP 10 agile interview questions. There is another list of critical questions while these are expected in most interviews. Moreover these are very basic, and every interviewee is expected to excel in his/her responses for these questions.

  • What is agile roadmap looks like? Explain agile process start to end? How do you start agile project? What is the difference between product roadmap and Release planning?

Refer Agile Roadmap

  • What is Test Driven Development? How does it differs from traditional method where tests were written before the actual code?
  • What is continuous integration? How do you achieve that?
  • What is scope creep and how do you manage that within sprint?
  • What are the core artifacts of sprint? Elaborate them?
  • What is the role of Scrum Master, Product Owner and Team Member? Or what are the typical roles in Scrum?

Refer Scrum Roles and Responsibilities

  • What is Velocity and Story Points? How do you relate story points to hours? Is it right?

Refer Story Points Vs Time

  • What type of metrics or reports you have in agile? Explain?
  • Explain Sprint Ceremonies? Planning & Grooming, Stand-up, Demo or Showcase and Retrospective.

Refer

Scrum Ceremonies – Daily Stand Ups

Scrum Ceremonies – Planning and Grooming

Scrum Ceremonies – Retrospectives

Scrum Ceremonies – Demo/Review or Showcase

  • Explain Agile in 2 minutes? When should you use Agile? Explain the instances when you prefer to go with Waterfall over Agile

Refer Agile in 2 minutes

I would be writing other important questions in addition to questions focused for Managers, Directors, Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, Team Members and Product Owners in my upcoming blogs.

 

Agile Appraisal – What to consider
 

If you are a manager and above in agile work environment and you need to go with appraisal, you might have encountered situations where what to expect from your team members compare to traditional model.  The focus is on collaboration, pairing, individual ownership for self and team. The “Working for team” culture over work for “self” make it more difficult.  One of the recommendation I have for all the managers or individuals responsible for doing appraisals for agile team is to have  a certain percentage allocated to team success in everyone’s goal,  and further how the team collaborates and how well they work together.  The percentage can differ with experience of an agile team member and expectations what you have from your team.

When it comes to individual performance (obviously there is a percentage attached to this as well which is typically little above than team success), I prefer to look at three factors which covers it all.

1. Competence – Demonstrates strong leadership in one or more areas (e.g., technical, project management, process, etc.). Consistently works to leverage skills for team and larger organization success.

  • Breadth and depth of knowledge and skills
  • Problem solving ability
  • Technical, communication, interpersonal, business skills
  • Leadership and innovation, applied to people, processes, and projects

2. Contribution – Someone who has a lot of initiative, is a leader across the organization, and has outstanding productivity.

  • Ability to meet commitments
  • Overall productivity and volume of output
  • Early communication of problems and contribution to workarounds that meets business goals
  • Versatility – willingness and ability to adapt to new tasks
  • Teamwork – willingness and ability to help others
  • Leadership skills such as architecture, project management, change management, communication, and mentoring
  • Ability to motivate others, manage self, and demonstrate initiative.

3. Value to business – This is very critical. What kind of value you are adding to business. There could be high competence and contribution to build a product while ROI (Return on investment) should never be ignored.

  • Knowledge and skills as mapped to needs of the business
  • Extra points here for unique skills we need

Every agile member should ask three questions to himself/herself frequently

  • Am I learning?
  • Am I contributing?
  • Am I making a difference?

The manager should ask the same questions to himself/herself and same for his team. If the answer is no then appropriate development goals must be planned and discussed.

The biggest goals for a manager should be in while managing agile project should be

  • Sprint success
  • Continuous Improvement
  • Constant Learning
  • Building Self Organizing Teams

 

Why do we need tasks? What is the need of Planned, Actual and Remaining hours?
 

I have repeatedly heard from teams that we have done estimation for stories in terms of story points or t-shirt sizes hence now why do we create tasks or if at all if we create tasks why do we add hours to tasks?  Add to that what is the need for specifying actual vs remaining hours every day for each task. The story is good enough to know what is to be done so why look at tasks. The benefits over challenges are much bigger and you can be truly convinced when you attempt it.

The recommendation is to have tasks created for each story.  Typically individual task should not be more than a day. If that’s the case, break it down further. Almost every task can be practically broken down to meet this criteria.  Once tasks are created, each task should be tagged to approx. hours needed for the same.

While creating tasks not just restrict yourselves to functional requirements while focus on following but not limited to

  • Non Functional Requirements (Performance, Security, Scalability, compliance, accessibility, maintainability etc. )
  • Dependency
  • Constraints
  • Acceptance criteria

The best time to create task is pre-grooming which is done few days ago before actual sprint planning/grooming.  It is my personal recommendation to get as many tasks as possible before you go for actual grooming. You can always convince team how you have come up with these tasks.

I am listing some of the core benefits of creating tasks, assign hours to each tasks during planning, smaller tasks and further constantly entering actual hours and hours remaining

  • The tasks add lots of clarity to story. I always advice individuals to create tasks before actual planning meeting. The pre-grooming done in advance in earlier sprint is when tasks should be created. This results in better estimation further result in better planning.
  • It is always simple to do individual smaller tasks over doing entire story. It is undoubtedly faster better and cheaper option.
  • Having tasks for individual story make it very easy to share your story work with other team members.
  • The hour assignment for each tasks helps in predictability of complete the tasks. The risks can be mitigated much earlier or in many cases it can be avoided during planning itself.
  • The actual vs remaining helps to come up with burndown chart which is one of the core artifact of agile teams. You can always have burndown based on # of items closed or velocity burned but that doesn’t give clarity and adds up little or no value.
  • Adds lot of value to individual accountability as it gives clear picture in terms of who is doing what and whether he/she is taking longer or getting it done early. This is one of the main cause many agile members are not inclined to go and add that much of details. The thinking of to become accountable is not a good idea is in reality bad for developers. More than an organization loss, they are killing their careers.
  • Small victories (after completing each tasks) gives motivation to individuals.
  • You are directly or indirectly reducing assumption on stories resulting success chances getting better. “Assumption is mother of all screw ups”. You can’t run away with assumptions while reducing the numbers helps you to do more.
  • The question which you might ask your stakeholders at later stage is typically unearthed well in advance.
  • In majority of cases better sprint success rate by having tasks and further hours (Planned, actual and remaining)
  • The nonfunctional requirements (security, performance, scalability etc) are listed in advance and these are being considered while planning
  • These NFRs, code reviews, testing etc are never missed. Typically POs encourages to list only requirements those have business values while I always recommend to write all the tasks which you are going to do.
  • The dependencies, constraints are identified. Moreover the acceptance criteria is well covered. The tasks suffice the need for missing SRS (Software Requirement Specifications) in agile projects.
  • The productivity is bound to be better in addition to quality. I have personally worked with tons of teams and experience the same.
  • Better bonding within team as things are BETTER organized.
  • You can better calculate matrices like productivity, cycle time, utilization etc.