Agile Abuse – Scenario 5
 

Ron – Developer 1, Amy – Scrum Master

Amy – How come we committed 45 story points and we accomplished 51 though I have not added any extra work to sprint.

Ron – The performance improvement story was little complicated hence I have added 6 additional points to it.

Amy – Once an estimate is done, it is not supposed to change in any case. If so, the whole point of estimation has no value.

Ron – Sorry, I will change that back to original and add the challenges encountered with that story to our process asset library.

Challenge – It is perfectly alright to play with estimation at any point in time.  

Agile Abuse – Scenario 4
 

Paula – Customer, Amy – Manager

Paula – Amy, you mentioned that Agile is supposed to be faster. Why don’t you speed up the work with the same team? Sprint velocity is supposed to be must faster sprint after sprint and the speed of work should constantly increase.

Amy – Too much of speed can affect the quality of work. Agile promotes sustainable development. In a long run, the overall benefit with respect to quantity or quality is going to be more in most circumstances while the sprint can run with a pace and all you can expect is little improvement sprint after sprint.

Paula – OK. Got it.

Challenge – ‘Sprinting’ means running super-fast.

Agile Abuse – Scenario 3
 

Ron – Manager, Amy – Scrum Master

Ron – Amy, why the heck stand-ups are going for an hour every day.

Amy – The team prefers to talk and sort out open items. Although there is some unwanted discussions as well but that is just to keep morale up. It is truly helping us to sort out open items every day.

Ron – There is something wrong here. Are the questions being asked or clarification expected common to all?

Amy – Not really. Once in a while, it is general but typically it’s between two people.  It helps everyone to get the perspective.

Ron – You really need to take those discussions offline. The standup is supposed to end in less than 10 minutes (Worst case 15 minutes) for 10 member team.  You can do planning or grooming once or twice a week but that must have to be separate meeting and not a standup.

Challenge – A standup cannot be a meeting.

Agile Abuse – Scenario 2
 

Steve – Developer 1, Jeff – Developer 2

Steve (Evening) – Jeff, Can I pair with you on your story?

Jeff – Sure, but I am almost done with my story and moreover I would leave in another hour or so. If you are still interested, please join me.

Next day – Morning standup

Steve – I worked on adding comments field to our customer UI and further added that to database.

Jeff – I paired with Steve. Status – Ditto!!!

Message – I didn’t do anything hence pairing was a saver although it was knowledge transition.

Agile Abuse – Scenario 1
 

Kent – Scrum Master, Chris – Sr. Developer

Kent – Why do you work less than half a day?

Chris – I finish all my sprint work, I don’t need to look at time!

Kent – (During Sprint Planning) – I think we can pick more work. Chris, you being a senior developer, what do you say?

Chris – This is all we have been completing consistently in the past. That’s all we can do in given time hence we should not add more points.

Challenge – I leave very early because I finish my work and I pick very less because this is all I can do.

Abusing Agile – Part 1
 

Disclaimer – There is no intention to hurt anybody. The idea is to pass the learning and a MESSAGE. I have seen Agile getting abused and many a times it is visible to rest of the world except the one who is responsible for it. Click on each scenario to get more details.

Scenario 1 – I leave very early because I finish my work and I pick very less because this is all I can do.

Scenario 2  – I didn’t do anything hence pairing was a saver although it was knowledge transition.

Scenario 3 – A standup cannot be a meeting.

Scenario 4 – ‘Sprinting’ means running super-fast.

Scenario 5 – It is perfectly alright to play with estimation at any point in time.  

Scenario 6 – Story point is not about time, not even a range.

Scenario 7 – We will unearth acceptance criteria and requirements for a given story as we continue with development. Writing one liner description for a story should be fine and we will keep looking at it while work in progress during the sprint.  

 

Agile Top 10 Interview Questions
 

agilechamps.com top 10 interview questions

Following are the TOP 10 agile interview questions. There is another list of critical questions while these are expected in most interviews. Moreover these are very basic, and every interviewee is expected to excel in his/her responses for these questions.

  • What is agile roadmap looks like? Explain agile process start to end? How do you start agile project? What is the difference between product roadmap and Release planning?

Refer Agile Roadmap

  • What is Test Driven Development? How does it differs from traditional method where tests were written before the actual code?
  • What is continuous integration? How do you achieve that?
  • What is scope creep and how do you manage that within sprint?
  • What are the core artifacts of sprint? Elaborate them?
  • What is the role of Scrum Master, Product Owner and Team Member? Or what are the typical roles in Scrum?

Refer Scrum Roles and Responsibilities

  • What is Velocity and Story Points? How do you relate story points to hours? Is it right?

Refer Story Points Vs Time

  • What type of metrics or reports you have in agile? Explain?
  • Explain Sprint Ceremonies? Planning & Grooming, Stand-up, Demo or Showcase and Retrospective.

Refer

Scrum Ceremonies – Daily Stand Ups

Scrum Ceremonies – Planning and Grooming

Scrum Ceremonies – Retrospectives

Scrum Ceremonies – Demo/Review or Showcase

  • Explain Agile in 2 minutes? When should you use Agile? Explain the instances when you prefer to go with Waterfall over Agile

Refer Agile in 2 minutes

I would be writing other important questions in addition to questions focused for Managers, Directors, Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters, Team Members and Product Owners in my upcoming blogs.

 

PMI-Agile Certified Practitioner
 

Project Management Institute – Agile Certified Practitioner

The Agile Certified Practitioner formally recognizes your knowledge of agile principles and your skill with agile techniques. This is one of the most valued certification when it comes to Agile.

You can get all the information around this certification at

http://www.pmi.org/certifications/types/agile-acp

You must earn 21 PDUs (Professional Development Units) to be able to appear for this exam. You are expected to earn at least 30 PDU every three years in order to main the status of this certification.

PDU – One PDU can be earned with one hour of activity (training). As per the PMI “The professional development units(PDUs) are the measuring unit used to quantify approved learning and professional service activities.”