Bloated Domain Objects And CQRS (Command, Query Responsibility Segregation)
 

Problem of Bloated Domain objects

In business software applications, the domain objects (entities) are used to represent the business domain. As the application grows and adds more business logic, the service layer, mappers and other patterns gets applied. Often this leads to domain object becomes bloated and the related components become huge & un-maintainable.

CQRS solves the common problem of having a bloated Domain objects. The domain objects get bloated largely because of bounded context. The series of contexts which makes developers think that a single domain object is sufficient to handle all the related things. For example, a large Invoice object for handling Invoice, Shipment and handling change of address for customer . But in reality, these contexts (invoicing, shipment and change) need not be related to same Invoice entity.

What is Command, Query Responsibility segregation (CQRS)?

In order to simplify the Domain objects, CQRS proposes to have two types of domain entities.

  • those serving the command (ordering/assertion services)  – For example, SaveCustomer, CreateInvoice, ShipProduct etc
  • those serving a Query (request) – examples include GetCustomerAddress, SearchCustomer etc

With this separation, the complexity (number of fields, methods) of entities used becomes simplified. And hence the Data mapper layers & the service layers becomes more simplified.

Where can I use CQRS?

  • Largely complex system: Applying CQRS on a simple CRUD operation based system is a over kill. When there is a domain heavy system, like banking and financing systems, LOB applications where business logic, lots of boundary conditions are heavy. Where it makes DDD (Domain driven design) provides high value.
  • Situations where you will apply Microservices, Eventual consistency and Event Sourcing. When we have separation of concerns using CQRS, the microservices becomes much simpler to design and maintain. With Event sourcing we are focused on getting the data (query) from other related sources and is what CQRS propagates.

Final words

CQRS is a carefully thought out pattern for simplifying large and complex systems. And it should not be applied for simple green field applications. Do let me know what you think.

Language of the Developers
 

There are lots of people who tell me that they need to understand specific design patterns (factory, observer, chain of responsibility etc). And after we spend quite some time discussing the topic they brought up, I ask them why they wanted to understand the original topic. The answers were quite surprising to me. Most of them said, “Design patterns are the trend now”. Some of them said, “I want to write good code”. Some of the candidly accepted “I was asked about this in an interview”.

Well, Design patterns are the new trend in the software industry and are being asked in most of the senior level technical interviews. For me, these reasons don’t qualify to take steps to understand design patterns. But the answer “I want to write good code” was quite interesting. Since a person wants to write good code, he/she is finding ways to improve it by applying patterns. Of course, Design patterns are good to understand and it saves time to know about how to solve a requirement/problem. If we take a step back and see if we really need to understand Design patterns to write good software, the answer is a big NO. Good software’s have emerged even before GoF patterns were documented. So why do we need to understand Design patterns?

When we write the code required to solve the problems, when we write optimal code, when we write code which is readable, testable and maintainable, we would have already applied the correct strategies/principles to solve the problem. But we should realize that when we write code we create a document not only for the compiler but also for other developers to read. How can we explain our code to another developer in a short time? We need a language !! Christopher Alexander (father of design patterns) calls this as the Pattern Language. A language that professional designers can use to communicate designs. He defines what are patterns with respect to this language.

The elements of this language are entities called patterns. Each pattern describes a problem that occurs over and over again in our environment, and then describes the core of the solution to that problem, in such a way that you can use this solution a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice. — Christopher Alexander

In Software terms, Design patterns are the constructs of a language, professional software developers can use to communicate their design. Until a developer needs to communicate their design/code, they need not know Design patterns! But developers communicate mostly with code. When the code communicates, patterns in the code will help the reader to quickly understand it.