TDD (Test Driven development)

 

There are lots of practices that need to be followed while doing XP as an agile methodology. And one of them is automated testing. However, there is lots of confusion in the tech industry if you want to test the behavior of the system or the subunits/parts of the system. First, lets us understand these terminologies. In this post, we will talk about Test driven development.

TDD (Test Driven development)

TDD or Test Driven development is an approach in which unit tests drive the development of the code. That is, when there is a new feature that needs to be developed, the unit tests corresponding to the feature is developed first before the actual code need to create the feature is coded.

Let’s take an example. Let’s say at a point of sale system, we need to calculate the bill based on the list of products picked by the consumer. Let’s write unit test corresponding to this code. (I have used C# based XUnit as the unit testing framework)

        [Fact(DisplayName = "SimpleBiller Should Calculate Total bill Amount")]
        public void SimpleBillShouldCalculate()
        {
            //Given
            var ProductsList = new List();
            ProductsList.Add(new Product { Name = "test Product1", Price = 5 });
            ProductsList.Add(new Product { Name = "test Product2", Price = 5 });
            var simpleBill = new SimpleBiller();

            //When
            var bill = simpleBill.GenerateBill(ProductsList);

            //then
            Assert.Equal(10, bill.TotalCost);
        }

In the above Unit test, we have 3 parts.

  • Given
  • When
  • Then

Given

This is the known part of the problem. i.e in mathematical terms, it’s part of the problem. In the example, we have initialized the variables and known things corresponding to the products (selected by the consumer) and the Biller object.

When

This is the business action based on which we are writing the code. In this case its GenerateBill action/method.

Then

The purpose of the tests is to ensure that the code/action does it properly as per the plan. In order to do that, we are asserting the assumptions/result of the method we are testing. In our case, we are asserting the total amount that the bill will have to be generated for.

Running the test

There are three stages of running the test.

  • Red – When we run the test now, it will fail as there is no code corresponding to the calculate bill functionality.
  • Green – In order to fix the above test, let’s write the real code corresponding to the above unit test/requirement.
        public Bill GenerateBill(IEnumerable products)
        {
            var bill = new Bill { Products = products };
            foreach (var product in bill.Products)
            {
                bill.TotalCost += product.Price;
            }

            return bill;
        }

Now, when we call GenerateBill method from the test, it will return the Bill with the total amount.

  • Refactor – With the above code written corresponding to the test, we are sure the functionality is correct as per the requirement. But the code is not optimal, as the foreach loop can be reduced to a simple C# LINQ  expression.
        public Bill GenerateBill(IEnumerable products)
        {
            var bill = new Bill { Products = products };
            bill.TotalCost = bill.Products.Sum(x => x.Price);
            return bill;
        }

Conclusion

TDD is a foolproof approach to developing software as per the requirement. The test also provides confidence to the developers on the edge conditions and other possibilities in the code. However, there is an alternative thought that TDD could waste developer time. Do you think, TDD is the right approach to software development? Please provide your comments.

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