The ONE Invisible Code – Think beyond mediocrity & rise to the Next Level – Book Review
 
I just read an interesting book The ONE Invisible Code – I loved every bit of it. Sharat has done complete justice to convey the message to rise beyond mediocrity.  
In this post, I am sharing with you what I found to be interesting in the book. Firstly, this is one of the finest books I read in the recent past. The book is very practical and filled with exercises. This helps you apply the concepts you learn immediately.
 
The book starts with Joy and his struggles. A failed entrepreneur and an employee. He meets his Mentor in unusual circumstances. The book then picks momentum and is an interesting conversation between Joy and his Mentor. During the conversation, Joy’s mentor helps him get unstuck and makes him realize his full potential.  
 
The book is divided into 4 sections:
 

Section 1: Orbit of Mastery Vs Orbit Of Mediocrity – Where are you?

Here is where the foundation of every great success is presented in an interesting way. The concept of Orbit Of Mastery and Orbit Of Mediocrity. When we give too much emphasis on safety overgrowth, comfort over the challenge, and short-term pleasure over long-term purpose, we get stuck in the orbit of mediocrity. Mastery begins with self-awareness is something that I really enjoyed.

Section 2: The 4 Mindsets
Knowing and mastering our mindset is the key to achieving all the success and fulfillment. The top priority of every successful individual, entrepreneur, or a corporate leader has been the power of mastering their mindset. When you know your mindset, you can consciously choose to change and sail through any adversity that life throws at you. Learn 4 mindsets and discover your inner potential.
 

Section 3. Owning The Truth

All high achievers own certain truths which help them create exemplary results. Many of these unconventional truths make you think beyond what you have learned. It’s time to challenge the conventional wisdom and learn to own these truths

 

Section 4: The ‘ONE’ Invisible Code
All high achievers practice a pattern or a series of steps to achieve massive success. Do you want to know what are these steps? Do you want to decode these patterns and find that invisible code? You can discover these steps to breakthrough mediocrity and reach the next level of success in the book.

 
Here is a 90sec introduction video of the book https://youtu.be/JXnf-ASjAYg
 
You can grab a copy of the book using this link 

The ‘One’ Invisible Code: An Uncommon Formula To Breakthrough Mediocrity & Rise to the Next Level

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Preview YouTube video Introduction – The ‘ONE’ Invisible Code

The Culture Code – Daniel Coyle – A Quick Book Review
 

Figure – what is common among a special Operations Military Unit, a professional movie studio, a Professional Basketball Team, and of course a Gang of Jewel Thieves?

Confused how this most diverse set of groups can have anything in common – The one loud response I could gather was exemplary Team Culture.  Team culture is one single most powerful force to achieve the maximum outcome in any undertaking.

In the Culture Code, Daniel Coyle, takes us deeper into the team-building aspects of some of the leading organizations in the world.

Coyle starts with a definition of culture that’s a little bit different than the norm. He says, “Culture is a set of living relationships working toward a shared goal. It’s not something you are, it’s something you do.” So, what is it that you do? What do people in organizations that create strong cultures do that their peers in other organizations don’t do?

Culture Code - Daniel Coyle

There are three most significant skills at the heart of great teamwork as per the book.

  1. Build safety to make everyone feel comfortable in working together

Safety is an important enabler that allows us to do great work. For example, keeping our day job can help us practice our creativity freely in a side hustle. Similarly, a work environment in which you feel safe in acting as you naturally would and speaking your mind is very conducive to group work. It’s only natural: you don’t want to keep looking over your back all the time, because if you need to, you can never really focus on the task at hand. Anybody could predict the outcomes of negotiations within five minutes of starting a session. That’s because how close we are to our co-workers, whether we mimic their behavior, and look into their eyes, are instant tells of how safe we feel. One good way to make others feel safer is to confirm you understand what they’re telling you by occasionally interjecting affirmations like “uh-huh,” “yes,” “got it,” and so on. Just don’t interrupt them.

  1. Share vulnerability to show no one needs to be perfect

When we share our own flaws with others, something amazing happens. He calls it a vulnerability loop, in which other people detect when we signal vulnerability, thus signal vulnerability too, and thus both parties become closer and trust each other more. Workplaces are usually seen as competitive, especially in the Western world, we think we need to look confident and powerful all the time. But that’s not true. It’s usually the person who takes the first step in admitting they’re not perfect, who’s perceived as a leader, not the one who berates others for being weak.

Vulnerability not just increases trust, it’s also a way to show acceptance: if you admit no one’s perfect, people will feel okay even after making mistakes, which are inevitable in accomplishing a shared goal.

  1. Establish purpose through a common goal and a clear path to get there

Put simply, the purpose is a set of reasons for doing what you do. In the case of a group, it’s the sum of all beliefs and values among your team, as they relate to achieving your common goal. That goal might be something straightforward, like selling the most phones any company has ever sold, but ideally, it’s about something bigger, like making phone users feel special and that they have good taste. Since the goal is in the future, but your group lives in the now, your purpose should be like a bridge between the two. Thus, if you can come up with a simple narrative as to how your purpose will help you go from today to tomorrow and reach your goal, you’ll be able to activate those around you.

With safety, vulnerability, and purpose all in one place, it’ll be almost impossible to stop you and your team from accomplishing whatever you set out to do! There are several chapters about each skill. There’s a good mix of stories and studies. Coyle chooses his examples carefully and tells their stories well. He doesn’t use bullet points or frequent summaries, so sometimes you will work to tease out his meaning.

Most business authors put summaries of key points or action steps at the end of every chapter. Coyle doesn’t. Instead, he includes a chapter at the end of every section, titled “Ideas for Action.” That chapter functions as a review of the other chapters in the section. I think that’s a good device, but I’d rather he also put his key points at the end of every chapter.

I thoroughly reinstated my beliefs of building team cultures after reading this book and will recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the transformation of the team culture.

You can buy “The Culture Code” book here

 

 

The five dysfunctions of a team – How to build a great team
 

I got an opportunity to drive ‘team book reading’ with my highly competent team for one of the very critical facets of team building i.e. “What it takes to be successful as a Team”. The book chose was “The five dysfunctions of a team – A leadership fable” which I personally found very interesting hence thought of sharing the summary with you all.

Precisely the book talks about the five dysfunctions of a team that restricts the team to be successful. It is very important to understand and overcome them in order to be more effective as a team. The dysfunctions are

Absence of trust
Trust & respect are the foundation stones of any relationship be it a home or office. If the members of the team do not trust each other then they cannot be completely honest with each other.

Hence “Create Trust” by following but not limited to:

  • 360-degree feedback
  • Spend time together
  • Understand each other personal history
  • Believe in each other
  • Be honest

Fear of conflict – Without trust, team members will not have healthy debates that are necessary to arrive at better thought through decisions.
It’s very important to have open lines of communication (so that everyone is clear & aligned). Always remember

  • Open discussions. Debate leads to a better solution
  • Focus on the issue, not the individual.

Hence “Value Conflict” (It has to be in a healthy way!) by following but not limited to:

  • Straight talk
  • Calling people on behavior traits that demonstrate fear of conflict
  • Identify how we respond
  • The leader leads in behavior

Lack of commitment – If the team has not aligned to a decision then the individual members who did not agree with the final decision will ultimately be less committed to that decision. It is important to know that the “Alignment” is more important than agreement

Hence “Encourage commitment” by following but not limited to:

  • Summaries decisions made in group discussions or meetings
  • Come to consensus — Any decision is better than no decision – Timeboxing decisions.
  • Clarify all scenarios including worst-case ones.
  • Talk it loud, hear everyone’s opinion.

Avoidance of accountability – If they are not committed to the course of action, then they are less likely to feel accountable (or hold other people accountable). Lack of clarity of roles & responsibilities and not holding individuals accountable leads to “Avoidance of accountability”
Hence “Promote Accountability” by following but not limited to

  • Open disclosure of goals, standards, and metrics
  • Continuous progress reviews
  • Reward for a team not individual

Inattention to results – If the individuals are not accountable, they are less likely to care about the group results (Instead they would focus on achieving their individual goals).
Hence “Celebrate Results” by following but not limited to:

  • Group declaration of results
  • The reviews to be based on results.
  • The leader should lead to behavior.

Disclaimer “This is a just summary of the book we read – In order to have more details, you are required to read the complete book”.

You can find the book at this link

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